For anyone who still has devices with old AA, AAA, C, D, or 9V type batteries in it I highly recommend you move over to the USB chargable Li-ion type of the same format.

Most of those devices dont work with traditional rechargable batteries like NiMH because the voltage is a bit lower. Even if they do work they tend to last only a short period of time because as they discharge the voltage drops even further. So your device will often die even with 70% of charge still in those batteries.

With the newer USB rechargeable Li-ion type batteries of the same form factor, however, you have a drop-in replacement that doesnt have those issues. They basically are a LI-ion battery with a built in charger but more importantly with a DC-Dc converter to keep the voltage fixed at the desired voltage (1.5V or 9V) for the entire life of the battery. So they work in any device that they can fit in and lasts a long time as they deliver 100% of their power before cutting out (at which point it drops from 1.5V directly to about 0V).

The only downside is if your device reports a battery percentage then it will report 100% battery right up until it hits 0.

Anyway I replaced all my devices with batteries like this and they last longer than regular batteries in some cases (especially with 9V)... so I am sold!

@freemo Another disadvantage is the noise from the DC/DC converter, which can upset sensitive circuits. Most devices are probably okay, though.

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@niconiconi yea as long as you arent using it in an o-scope or some sort of audio device you are probably fine.. even then an oscope or audio device may filter it out or shield from it.

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