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metapsyche @metapsyche@qoto.org

This is brilliant: using magnet+light to detect malaria. (Malaria parasites release Hemozoin which is magnetic...) npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/

Insect collapse: ‘We are destroying our life support systems’

“I don’t think most people have a systems view of the natural world,”

“But it’s all connected and when the invertebrates are declining the entire food web is going to suffer and degrade. It is a system-wide effect.”

theguardian.com/environment/20

Your Brain Doesn't Contain Memories. It Is Memories.
Therefore, this year I will put more priority on shared experiences with other people: I will treasure my time with family & friends. We will visit more places, an try all kinds of food we never tried before, and drink stuff we never had before :)
wired.com/story/your-brain-is-

I've never heard anyone else lament the wasted CPU cycles spent on bitcoin mining, so this is just me expressing how we could've used all those computing power for more novel purposes. I could be wrong. I mean no offense to bitcoin miners. so please educate me gently, dear .

When I think about the more important problems that could use cpu cycles, such as Hilbert's Mathematical problems, or Riemann's conjecture, I SMH at the wasted computing power devoted for bitcoin mining. Such a waste, man!

I'm so glad i didn't get into bitcoin mining. I was attracted to the idea of decentralized currency but i could not get myself to waste cpu cycles & energy for calculating what i see as wasteful--because mining is intentionally designed to be resource-intensive and difficult.

Pretty cool to witness the birth of a black hole (or maybe a neutron star) which happened around 2 million years ago, but we're just seeing only now!
Not so cool for lifeforms (if any) on any planet around its vicinity, though.

engadget.com/2019/01/11/resear

Machine learning leads mathematicians to unsolvable problem

Simple artificial-intelligence problem puts researchers up against a logical paradox discovered by famed mathematician Kurt Gödel.

nature.com/articles/d41586-019

i think it's cool if a young new sun captures a crystallized red-dwarf in orbit that then becomes a crystal planet! esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_S

Big Crowds Flow Like Water in Amazing (and Terrifying) Ways

Hydrodynamic theory helps to explain how large human crowds flow like water.

psychologytoday.com/au/blog/th

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"Why do you go away? So that you can come back. So that you can see the place you came from with new eyes and extra colors. And the people there see you differently, too. Coming back to where you started is not the same as never leaving."

— Terry Pratchett, A Hat Full of Sky

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“That person who helps others simply because it should or must be done, and because it is the right thing to do, is indeed, without a doubt, a real superhero.” - Stan Lee

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#Minimalism isn’t about removing things you love. It’s about removing things that distract you from the things you love. #minimalistHome

And this is why I love .

Early Predictions of the Internet Date Back to 19th Century -Fi

Science fiction writers are professional future-dreamers, imagining worlds far beyond their own. With technology advancing at astronomical rates, real life feels more and more like sci-fi every day (for better or worse). So it’s fun to look back at those writers who, decades and even centuries ago, imagined what life would be like now—and some of their predictions were surprisingly accurate.

paleofuture.gizmodo.com/early-

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predictions, right and wrong, about 2019

The future is now. Back in the early '80s, we were wondering what the distant future had in store, what it would be like. Well, that -- 2019 -- is almost here.

triblive.com/business/technolo

A Single Amoeba Cell Hints at a Solution to the Biggest Problem in , The Travelling Salesman Problem

popularmechanics.com/science/m