What kind of world are we in, when a camera lens needs a software update to work with a new camera? (I am not a user of either system)
petapixel.com/2020/10/01/sigma

Very long article, oriented towards policy change. Issues should be familiar to everyone on this platform (and appreciation of that is probably why you are here).
on Surveillance Capitalism
onezero.medium.com/how-to-dest

Instead of using a text editor or Notepad on my computer for everyday work, I now use as a persistent scratchpad, a new page each day. The feature of creating often helps in copy-and-paste to other applications. I haven't exercised citations, yet, but probably will, shortly.

> Roam let’s you manage knowledge, but not really write documents, and Zettlr let’s you write documents, and, to a much smaller extent let’s you manage knowledge! twitter.com/thejonotron/status

The editorial declares that the brain drain of 15,000 Canadians to the United States between years 2000-2010 could be reversed, with corporations near-shoring northwards.

> Canada already exerts a powerful pull on people from the rest of the world. A global Gallup survey, conducted from 2015 through 2017, shows Canada is one of the most desired destinations for potential immigrants. Among the highly educated, those with at least a bachelor’s degree, more people around the world would, if they could, move to Canada than the United States.

"Dear Donald: Thanks for the new immigration wall. Love, Canada" at theglobeandmail.com/opinion/ed

Consumer grade audio and video recording devices are practically near professional broadcast quality. Post-production workflows have adjusted to becoming asynchronous for the daily late night television shows.
theverge.com/21288117/late-nig

Authentically appreciating "causal texture" from the Emery and Trist (1965) article leads us through the meanings of contextualism and contextural, texture, causal, and transactional environment c.f. contextual environment.
coevolving.com/blogs/index.php

Racial bias in AI models now sees IBM ethically prioritizing social responsibility ahead of technological capability. We can, but should we? Are responses on Twitter indicative of Silicon Valley morality? twitter.com/TechCrunch/status/

A 1989 book celebrating " in Canada", with a chapter by David Morley (Dean, Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University (Toronto), 2001-2004), filled in gaps between 1965 "The of " to current day on organizations.

coevolving.com/blogs/index.php

David Ing boosted

Waitor: What can I get you?

Me: I will take some chicken periods, well cooked with some bovine lactation, some of it in a cup, fresh, and the rest with a bacterial infestation and old enough to solidify, you can put that on the chicken periods. As a side I'll take the head of a pig boiled with spicies until it produces a slurry, then sliced and fried, thanks.

Waitor: we are out of milk

Me: ok then the fresh squeezed liquid from the reproductive organs of a tree, any one will do.

Waitor: We have orange juice

me: that is fine, thank you.

Waitor: Wonderful, thats one omlet with cheese, a side of scrapple, and a glass of orange juice. Coming right up!

In an ecology of nations,

> “For the British and Canadians to say no publicly is highly unusual,” given their closeness to the United States, said Carl Bildt, the former Swedish prime minister. 

P.S. I am a Canadian.
nytimes.com/2020/06/02/world/e

David Ing boosted

Will this decade be called the "Dark Twenties", in post-pandemic economic sociology? writes:
> It took years for Western economies to fully recover from the economic shock of 2008-09. This shock is far worse. How much worse? No one can be sure. [....]

> We are entering the Dark Twenties. No one knows when or how it will end.

theglobeandmail.com/politics/a

Moderating social media context in an nuanced way may be done with a warning or caution, rather than by deleting the message or banning the individual. at analyzes fact-checking on POTUS.

> Now, Twitter has done just this. Trump’s tweet has not been removed — but it has been placed behind a notice, identifying it as problematic.

washingtonpost.com/politics/20

Our immune systems are complex, so improving resistance to disease may be puffery, writes .
> I looked at how the phrase “boosting our immune system” is being represented on social media. This concept is everywhere right now: it is being pushed by .... But in reality, the immune system is fantastically complex and can’t be “boosted.” (Even if you could, you wouldn’t want to. An overactive immune response is what leads to things such as anaphylaxis and autoimmune diseases.) The bottom line: There is no evidence that food, supplements, essential oils, spinal manipulation, IV vitamin infusions or really any product can enhance the functioning of the immune system in a manner that would provide extra protection against the coronavirus.

theglobeandmail.com/opinion/ar

Ventures founded on growth maximization thinking unicorn might instead turn towards sustainability as camels.

> Where Silicon Valley has been chasing unicorns (a colloquial term for startups with billion-dollar valuations), “camel” startups, such as those founded by leading global entrepreneurs, prioritize sustainability and resiliency.

> The humble camel adapts to multiple climates, survives without food or water for months, and has humps to protect itself from the desert’s deprivations. Unlike unicorns, camels are not imaginary creatures. The metaphor may not be as flashy, but camels are survivors – as are their startup counterparts.

theglobeandmail.com/opinion/ar

Death of the office, in pandemic times, with a larger perspective back in history.

> Offices have always been profoundly flawed spaces. Those of the East India Company, among the world’s first, were built more for bombast than bureaucracy. They were sermons in stone, and the solidity of every marble step, the elegance of every Palladian pillar, were intended to speak volumes about the profitability and smooth functioning within. This was nonsense, of course. Created to ensure efficiency, offices immediately institutionalised idleness. 

1843magazine.com/features/deat

While many outside of the field of architecture like the approach, it’s not so well accepted by his peers. A summary of criticisms by and is helpful in appreciating when the use of pattern language might be appropriate or not appropriate.
ingbrief.wordpress.com/2020/05

Wendell Berry:
> I trust instead people like the great Kentucky farmer Henry Besuden, who said, “If a man loves his soil, he’ll save it.”
orionmagazine.org/article/to-l

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